Saturday, June 21, 2014

German Tank Crew

 Early war photo of German Panzerkampfwagen IV Ausf.C or D (Sd.Kfz. 161) driver wearing the beret-type "Schutzmütze" (protective cap). This headgear consisted of the soft padded crash helmet, which served to protect the heads of the panzer crew from injuries sustained when the vehicle was motoring over rough terrain, and the black cover. The helmet was circular in shape and manufactured with 1.5cm thick felt or red rubber sponge. The exterior was covered in black cloth and the interior was covered in black oilcloth and a leather sweatband. Additionally there was a 3.5cm cloth covered rubber sponge around the circumference of the helmet with a groove to hold the elastic band of the cover in place. There were six ventilation holes in a circular pattern and one center hole. The cover was an oversized black wool beret with an elastic band to hold it in place on the helmet. The cover contained the insignia on the front. Early insignia included a woven wreath with a stamped metal cockade and no national emblem. By order HV 35, No. 646, dated 30 October 1935, a standard had been established for the wearing of insignia on the black panzer beret. It consisted of a woven wreath and cockade using white cotton, later changed to silver-gray, on a black backing. The national emblem was also woven with white cotton, later changed to silver-gray, or aluminum wire for officers, on a black backing. By order HM 41, No. 64, dated 15 January 1941, the black panzer beret was abolished and replaced, however, it was maintained for crews of the Panzer type 38(t), of Czech manufacture, for drivers and co-drivers of armored personnel carriers, and according to order HM 41, No. 277 dated 7 March 1941, for drivers and co-drivers of armored tractors of the type Sd.Kfz.251. Although out of production in 1941, it continued to be worn after this date.


Source:
http://www.panzerworld.com/uniforms-heer-headgear
http://www.ww2incolor.com/german-armor/Early+war+tank+crew.html

Friday, June 13, 2014

A Lone Panzer III in the African Desert

A lone Panzerkampfwagen III in the African desert. The gun seems to be a "5 cm Kampfwagenkanone 38 L/42", so this may be a Pz.Kpfw.III F or J (any of them in this range). Photo taken by General Erwin Rommel during his Campaign in North Africa, 1941


Source:
http://www.cybermodeler.com/history/germany/rommel.shtml
http://www.ww2incolor.com/tag/color?g2_itemId=224

Stuka in Africa

A Junkers Ju 87D Stuka, probably of Stukageschwader 3 (StG 3). Date would be start of 1942, as III./StG-3 converted to the D model around this time. Photo taken by General Erwin Rommel during his Campaign in North Africa


Source:
http://www.cybermodeler.com/history/germany/rommel.shtml
http://www.ww2incolor.com/german-air-force/stuka-540144.jpg.html

Italian Vehicles in the North African Desert

Italian vehicles in the African desert. At the front is Fiat Balilla 1100 Furgoncino, while in the background is FIAT type 666. Photo taken by General Erwin Rommel during his Campaign in North Africa, 1941


Source:
http://www.cybermodeler.com/history/germany/rommel.shtml
http://forum.axishistory.com/viewtopic.php?f=47&t=73232&p=1875458&hilit=rommel#p1875458

German Aircraft Over Africa

German aircraft over Africa. The white edges around the lake below indicated that they were actually a salt lake. Photo taken by General Erwin Rommel during his Campaign in North Africa, 1941


Source:
http://www.cybermodeler.com/history/germany/rommel.shtml

Thursday, June 12, 2014

Major Adolf Dickfeld Farewell Ceremony

Send-off celebration for Luftwaffe ace Major Adolf Dickfeld as he leaves II.Gruppe / Jagdgeschwader 11 (JG 11) to take up his new post as a "General für Führernachwuchs im Reichs-Luftfahrt-Ministerium und Reichs-Inspekteur der Flieger- Hitlerjugend" (General of recruitment of the Luftwaffe in the Reich Air Ministry and Reich inspector of the Hitler Youth Aviation). The photo was taken at Jever airfield, Niedersachsen (Germany), 31 May 1943, and it also shows a Cossack band taken from Caucasus! Dickfeld performing these staff duties until late in the war. He was to return to combat, flying Bü 181 trainers armed with Panzerfaust rockets, against Russian armour and, later, He 162 jet fighters. He reputedly shot down a P-47 several weeks before the end of the war with the He 162


Source:
Book "Footsteps of the Hunter" by Adolf Dickfeld

Wednesday, June 11, 2014

A Group of JG 2 Personnel in Tunisia

A group of II.Gruppe / Jagdgeschwader 2 (JG 2) "Richthofen" personnel in Tunisia, early 1943. Third from the left is Oberleutnant Erich Rudorffer (temporary Gruppenkommandeur of II./JG 2), who ended the war as a Major with 224 victories and the recipient of Ritterkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes mit Eichenlaub und Schwertern. To the right of Rudorffer is Oberleutnant Kurt Bühligen (Staffelkapitän 4./JG 2). One of the most successful German pilots in Tunisia, scoring 40 kills there. Bühligen ended the war as an Oberstleutnant with 112 victories and got the Ritterkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes mit Eichenlaub. Following the hospitalisation of Hauptmann Adolf Dickfeld (136 victories, RK-EL) with injuries received in a landing accident, Oberleutnant Rudorffer assumed temporary command of II./JG 2


Source:
Book "Footsteps of the Hunter" by Adolf Dickfeld

German Soldier with Muddy Helmet

This out of focus image of a soldier (Heeres Gruppenführer) with a muddy helmet (he must have been packing fudge) in Russia (1941) is being sale in German ebay for 109 Euros! There are some screwy people out there on eBay buying German WW2 color slides with more money than sense these days!


Source:
http://www.ebay.de/itm/Original-Farb-Dia-AGFA-Color-Klinzy-Russland-1941-Gruppenfuehrer-/331216372698?
http://www.wehrmacht-awards.com/forums/showthread.php?t=743255

Wounded RAD Feldmeister in the Eastern Front

This image of a wounded RAD (Reichsarbeitsdienst) Feldmeister in the Russian front which taken in 6 September 1941 where a lot of the subject is obscured by the shadow of the photographer is being sale in the ebay for 465 Euro! There are some screwy people out there on eBay buying German WW2 color slides with more money than sense these days!


Source:
http://cgi.ebay.de/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=331216372698
http://www.wehrmacht-awards.com/forums/showthread.php?t=743255

Tuesday, June 10, 2014

Walter Hoernlein with Map

Oberst Walter Hoernlein (Kommandeur Infanterie-Regiment "Großdeutschland") discussing strategy with his officer in the Russian front, summer of 1941. He is wearing the Ritterkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes #399 in his neck, which he received on 30 July 1941 as commander of Infanterie-Regiment 80. Later he would also got the Deutsches Kreuz in Gold (14 February 1943) and Eichenlaub #213 (15 March 1943), both as an officer in the Großdeutschland (GD). He continued to lead GD until 27th January 1944, building a solid reputation as a reliable and efficient leader who nevertheless always found time for his troops, earning the nickname “Papa” Hoernlein. Perhaps the most famous anecdote regarding Hoernlein refers to his allegedly sending a telex to the “Fuhrerhauptquartier” demanding to know if GD were the only Germans left on the eastern front, after they had been in continual action jumping from one crisis to another during the fighting around Rzhev!


Source:
http://forum.leslufteaux.com/t1677-la-guerre-en-couleurs

Wounded German Officer

Wounded Hauptmann of the German Wehrmacht with the bandaged hand in the Eastern Front during Operation Barbarossa, 1941. Requiring just a field dressing he decided to remains on the line


Source:
http://forum.leslufteaux.com/t1677p60-la-guerre-en-couleurs

Sunday, June 8, 2014

Fieseler Fi 156 "Storch" of General Erwin Rommel in North Africa

The Fieseler Fi 156 "Storch" light transport aircraft used by General Erwin Rommel in the North Africa. Rommel was known to hop in his Storch and fly over the battlefront to get a clearer picture on operations. Photo taken by Rommel himself during his Campaign in North Africa, 1941


Source:
http://www.cybermodeler.com/history/germany/rommel.shtml

Marinefährprahm (MFP) in the North African Harbor

This photo shows a MFP (or an Italian MZ) in the North African harbor (could be Benghazi or Tripoli), the load compartment cover (corrugated iron) is open at the bow. The photo is M.E. first class, because there are hardly any color photos of the MFP's. The Marinefährprahm (MFP) or "naval ferry barge" was the largest landing craft operated by Germany's Kriegsmarine during World War II. It served a variety of roles (transport, minelayer, escort, gunboat) in the Mediterranean, Baltic and Black Seas as well as the English Channel and Norwegian coastal waters. Originally developed for the proposed invasion of England (Operation Sea Lion), the first of these ships was commissioned on 16 April 1941, with approximately 700 being completed by the war's end in May 1945. Allied sources sometimes refer to this class of vessel as a "Flak Lighter" or "F-lighter". Photo taken by General Erwin Rommel during his Campaign in North Africa, 1941


Source:
http://www.cybermodeler.com/history/germany/rommel.shtml

Saturday, June 7, 2014

German Reconnaisance Force in North Africa

A small German reconnaisance force scanned the horizon looking for the sign of the enemy in North Africa. They are using Sonderkraftfahrzeug 250 (Sd.Kfz.250) and Horch Kfz.15 (Kraftfahrzeug 15) staff car. Photo taken by General Erwin Rommel during his Campaign in North Africa, 1941


Source:
http://www.cybermodeler.com/history/germany/rommel.shtml

German Afrikakorps Guard on Duty

German Afrikakorps guard on duty behind barbed wire overlooking a flat desert. He is wearing short pants, tropical uniform and pith helmet with goggles. Photo taken by General Erwin Rommel during his Campaign in North Africa, 1941. There is available about 169 color slides that Rommel took during his entire Africa campaign


Source:
http://www.cybermodeler.com/history/germany/rommel.shtml

Alfred Gause Posed for Rommel

Generalmajor Alfred Gause (Chef des Generalstabes Panzergruppe "Afrika") posed in the flowery grass of North Africa and sporting his Ritterkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes which he received in 13 December 1941. Photo taken by his commander, General der Panzertruppe Erwin Rommel (Kommandierender General Panzergruppe "Afrika") during his Campaign in North Africa, winter 1941/1942. Gause was initially sent to Africa with a large staff by Oberkommando des Heeres (OKH), the German Army High Command, to act as a liaison officer with the Italian High Command, Comando Supremo. Gause had specific instructions not to place himself under the command of Erwin Rommel, but did so when Rommel told him categorically that the command of all troops in Africa were vested in him. This was not correct, but Gause acceded to Rommel's authority, and served as his Chief of Staff. He proved invaluable to the famous desert commander, who was well known to direct his forces from the front and who frequently would lose touch with his command staff during operations. Gause spent two and a half years serving Rommel in the Afrika Korps. Though initially sent by OKH to keep an eye on the independent commander, they soon developed an excellent working relationship


Source:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alfred_Gause
http://www.cybermodeler.com/history/germany/rommel.shtml

Friday, June 6, 2014

German Artillery Officers in North Africa

German artillery officers in North Africa. They are still wearing their Continental uniform. Photo taken by General Erwin Rommel during his Campaign in North Africa, 1941


Source:
http://www.cybermodeler.com/history/germany/rommel.shtml

German Vehicles in the North African Desert

German vehicles in the North African desert. The picture was taken by General Erwin Rommel, commander of the Afrikakorps, from his Fieseler Fi 156 "Storch" during his reconnaisance mission to the front


Source:
http://www.cybermodeler.com/history/germany/rommel.shtml

Zeltbahn as Cover in the Desert

Soldiers of the Deutsches Afrikakorps (DAK) making a small trench as their home in the desert. They used Zeltbahn as cover and camouflage from the air and distance. Photo taken by General Erwin Rommel during his Campaign in North Africa, 1941


Source:
http://www.cybermodeler.com/history/germany/rommel.shtml

German Anti-Tank Crew in the Desert

German anti-tank crew with his camouflaged gun in the desert of Qattara depression. Photo taken by General Erwin Rommel during his Campaign in North Africa, 1941



Source:
http://www.cybermodeler.com/history/germany/rommel.shtml

Officer of the German Afrikakorps

Officer of the German Afrikakorps in front of Italian vehicle. They are wearing tropical uniform with pith helmet (tropenhelm). Photo taken by General Erwin Rommel during his Campaign in North Africa, 1941


Source:
http://www.cybermodeler.com/history/germany/rommel.shtml