Monday, December 30, 2013

Major Heinrich Gerlach

Heinrich Gerlach (as a Hauptmann) playing with a swine / pig. He was the glider pilot who fled Mussolini out of his confinement at Gran Sasso in 1943, and received Ritterkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes for that feat

Source:
Akira Takiguchi photo collection
http://www.wehrmacht-awards.com/forums/showthread.php?p=5617990&highlight=gerlach#post5617990

Thursday, December 26, 2013

German Soldiers March To The Front In Fall Blau

German soldiers from 25.Infanterie-Division/LIII.Armeekorps/2.Panzerarmee/Heeresgruppe Mitte marching to the front in the peak of "Fall Blau" (Case Blau), August 1942. In the background we can see the building of Savior Transfiguration Cathedral (Spaso-Preobragenskij Cathedral), built in 1841-51 to a design by one of Konstantin Thon's disciples

Source:
http://www.ww2incolor.com/german/troops_retreat.jpg.html

Panzer IVs Pass Knocked Out Universal Carrier

Two Deutsche Afrikakorps Panzer IV ausf F including turmnummer (turret number) 413 pass a knocked-out captured Carden Lloyd Universal Carrier Mark 1 serial number T33417 armed with a Boys .55 caliber (13.9mm) anti-tank gun. The Universal Carrier is painted in the Caunter camouflage scheme, which used grey, blue, black, sand, and brown paint, or whatever was available, to form straight angular lines that were thought to "dazzle" whomever saw the vehicle in the desert, making it hard to judge size and distance. The Carrier has a Nazi flag over it to prevent an air attack by friendly German aircraft; this was common practice to mark captured vehicles with the Swastika flag

Source:
http://www.worldwar2database.com/gallery3/index.php/wwii0137

French Troops Supported by American Tanks During the Fighting of the Italian Campaigns

Free French colonial troops supported by American tanks during the fighting of the Italian campaigns, May 1944 (LIFE has wrongfully captioned the month as August 1944!). They passed in front of abandoned Italian M42 Semovente 75/18 850(i) from German Panzerjäger-Abteilung 171/71.Infanterie-Division "Kleeblatt" (Cloverleaf). The Airfix White M3 Halftrack comes with an optional "canvas tilt" piece to cover the back (omitting the Five-oh and mount), and Red Cross markings

Source:
LIFE photo collection
http://images.google.com/hosted/life/80ae46c55ea6d803.html

French Troops Supported by American Tanks During the Fighting of the Italian Campaigns

Free French colonial troops supported by American tanks during the fighting of the Italian campaigns, May 1944 (LIFE has wrongfully captioned the month as August 1944!). They passed in front of abandoned Italian M42 Semovente 75/18 850(i) from German Panzerjäger-Abteilung 171/71.Infanterie-Division "Kleeblatt" (Cloverleaf). The Airfix White M3 Halftrack comes with an optional "canvas tilt" piece to cover the back (omitting the Five-oh and mount), and Red Cross markings

Source:
LIFE photo collection
http://images.google.com/hosted/life/80ae46c55ea6d803.html

Oberleutnant Karl Hanke in a Panzerkampfwagen IV

Panzerkampfwagen IV ausf.D (turmnummer 432) commanded by Oberleutnant (1st Lieutenant) Karl Hanke and assigned to the Panzer Regiment 25/7.Panzer Division under Generalmajor Erwin Rommel during the Battle of France. This propaganda photo appeared in Signal magazine in 1940

Source:
Signal magazine 1940

Panzerkampfwagen IVs of the Afrika Korps

A column of Panzerkampfwagen IVs on the move. Some of the men appear to be wearing the tropical hat (tropenhelm) first issued in 1941

Source:
Signal magazine

Panzerkampfwagen III Ausf N Unloaded in North Africa

Panzerkampfwagen III ausf N medium tanks are unloaded form a transport at Bizerte, Wilāyat Binzart, Tunisia, 23 November 1942

Source:
Signal magazine

Panzerkampfwagen III Crews at Rest and Playing Cards

The crews of a group of german panzers benefit from a pause during the advance to resume the never-ending card game, interrupted so many times. They were came from the 12. Armee commanded by Generalfeldmarschall Siegmund Wilhelm List during Operation Marita

Source:
Signal Magazine, June 1941 

Sunday, December 22, 2013

Panzer III and Panzergrenadier Advances Through the Kuban Steppe

Panzerkampfwagen III of Heeresgruppe Süd (Army Group South) advances through the Kuban Steppe on the Caucasus Mountains during Operation Blue (Unternehmen Blau/Fall Blau)

Source:
Signal Magazine, November 1942

Panzer III and Panzergrenadier Advances Through the Kuban Steppe

Panzerkampfwagen III of Heeresgruppe Süd (Army Group South) advances through the Kuban Steppe on the Caucasus Mountains during Operation Blue (Unternehmen Blau/Fall Blau)

Source:
Signal Magazine, November 1942

Panzer III and Panzergrenadier Advances Through the Kuban Steppe

Panzerkampfwagen III of Heeresgruppe Süd (Army Group South) advances through the Kuban Steppe on the Caucasus Mountains during Operation Blue (Unternehmen Blau/Fall Blau). The Panzer III is from the 6. Kompanie, 3. Zug and is tank number 3, going by its turret number '633'; there're a couple of symbols on the right rear mudgard- the one on the right might be that of the 1. Panzer-Division. Original caption from Signal magazine: "tank 633 spots a Russian anti-tank emplacement and at once opens fire"

Source:
Signal Magazine, November 1942

Friday, December 20, 2013

Disarmed French soldiers file pass German officers on the outskirts of Dunkirk

German forces move into Dunkirk. Disarmed French soldiers file pass German officers on the outskirts of Dunkirk. The evacuation of the British Expeditionary Force had been completed a few hours earlier

Source:
http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/listing/object-205012729?items_per_page=10&page=1

A beached French coastal patrol craft at low tide at Dunkirk

German forces move into Dunkirk hours after the evacuation of the British Expeditionary Force was completed. A beached French coastal patrol craft at low tide at Dunkirk. The ship is armed with a 75mm canon on its foredeck and probably dates from the First World War. A British Universal Carrier and a bicycle lie abandoned half buried in the sand

Source:
http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/listing/object-205012729

German officers inspect the Louis Bleriot memorial

German forces move into Dunkirk hours after the evacuation of the British Expeditionary Force. Curious German officers inspect the memorial to the French aviation pioneer, Louis Bleriot on the sea front at Dunkirk. It is surrounded by German vehicles and the litter of the British evacuation

Source:
http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/listing/object-205012729

German officer interrogates two captured French officers

On the outskirts of Dunkirk, a German officer interrogates two captured French officers who sit under guard near a roadside table laden with wine bottles. A German inflatable rubber dinghy is visible behind the table

Source:
http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/listing/object-205012729

German officers confer by their vehicles at Dunkirk roadside

On the outskirts of Dunkirk, German officers confer by their vehicles at the roadside before moving into the town

Source:
http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/listing/object-205012729

Thursday, December 19, 2013

German troops pulling a 37mm anti-tank gun along a road near Dunkirk

German troops pulling a 37mm anti-tank gun along a road near Dunkirk. Immobilised British Scout carriers are parked at the side of the road

Source:
http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/listing/object-205012729

German Junkers Ju 52 transport plane in white winter camouflage colours prepares to take off

Winter landscape: a German Junkers Ju 52 transport plane in white winter camouflage colours prepares to take off in the snow after the onset of the Russian winter

Source:
http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/listing/object-205012729

Vehicles and troops of the German mobile assault unit Motorensturm 13

German forces arrive in Dunkirk. The sea front at Dunkirk photographed immediately after the completion of the evacuation of the British Expeditionary Force earlier in the day. Vehicles and troops of the German mobile assault unit Motorensturm 13, drawn up on the sea front at Dunkirk near one of the unit's light anti-tank guns

Source:
http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/listing/object-205012729

Crew of a German Light Anti-Aircraft Gun at Dunkirk

A photo taken by Hermann Weper, an officer serving with Maschinengewehr-Bataillon 52, on 4 June 1940 following the seizure of Dunkirk: German forces arrive in Dunkirk. The sea front at Dunkirk photographed immediately after the completion of the evacuation of the British Expeditionary Force earlier in the day. The crew of a 20mm Flak 38 gun of the German mobile assault unit Motorensturm 13 stand guard on the seafront. The gun is covered with a camouflage shelter quarter. Debris left by the evacuating British forces is visible in the background.

Source:
http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/listing/object-205012729

Thursday, December 12, 2013

Conference at 6. Panzer-Division HQ

Late summer 1941: a front-line conference at the forward HQ of 6. Panzer-Division. From left to right: Generalmajor Franz Landgraf (Kommandeur 6. Panzer-Division); General der Panzertruppe Georg Hans Reinhardt (Kommandierender General XXXXI. Panzerkorps); unknown officer; and Major im Generalstab Johann-Adolf Graf von Kielmansegg (Ia Erster Generalstabsoffizier 6. Panzer-Division). The last one would rose after the war to general's rank in the Bundeswehr and commanded NATO-AFCENT


Source:
Book "The 6th Panzer Division: 1937-45" by Oberst a.D. Helmut Ritgen

Panzer III of 11. Panzer-Division in a Russian Village

Panzerkampfwagen III Ausf.H tanks of 11. Panzer-Division enter a Soviet village. Note the equipment covered by tarps and the extra track on the Panzer III ("21") in the background. Behind the front tank we can see the Ghost emblem of the Division. Crews would live out of their vehicle. The Panzer III in the foreground has a Swastika flag strapped on the turret for identification by German aircraft. Soon fighting would ground to a halt as both the Germans and the Soviets would seek to survive the Russian winters

Source:
http://www.worldwar2database.com/gallery3/index.php/wwii120

Panzer III Negotiating a River Crossing

Panzerbefehlswagen (Command Tank) III Ausf H(U) Tauchfahrig (Submersible Motor Vehicle), also known as Tauchpanzer or U-Panzer (Submersible Diving Tank, Underwater Tank), negotiating a river crossing in central Europe during World War II

Source:
http://cas.awm.gov.au/photograph/044596

Panzer III Negotiating a River Crossing

Panzerbefehlswagen (Command Tank) III Ausf H(U) Tauchfahrig (Submersible Motor Vehicle), also known as Tauchpanzer or U-Panzer (Submersible Diving Tank, Underwater Tank), negotiating a river crossing in central Europe during World War II

Source:
Book "A Photo History of Tanks in Two World Wars" by George Forty, page 80

Wednesday, December 11, 2013

Sherman Tanks of 7th Armored in St. Vith

M4 Sherman medium tanks of the 40th Tank Battalion, Combat Command R, 7th Armored Division, take up defensive positions in a field near St. Vith after retaking the village from the Germans

Source:
http://www.worldwar2database.com/gallery3/index.php/wwii0082

Spanish Foreign Volunteers of the Wehrmacht

Spanish member of 1.Bataillon/Infanterie-Regiment 263/250.Infanterie-Division. Men from this division were called "Blue Division" (División Azul) because of the blue Falangist shirt they wearing in the siege of Leningrad. The fahnenträger (flag holder) is wearing gasplane (gas mask bag), MP40 ammo pouch, and stahlhelm with Wehrmacht/Spanish flag decals. Also he is holding the banner of his batallion. Note the Spanish award on their uniform! The red one is the "Cruz al Mérito Militar con Distintivo Rojo"; the yellow one is the "Medalla de Mutilado de Guerra por la Patria"

Source:
http://ww2images.blogspot.com/2012/12/member-of-250-infanterie-division.html

French Foreign Volunteers of the Wehrmacht

French soldiers (with MP40) of the Légion des Volontaires Français (soon to be 33.Waffen-Grenadier-Division der SS "Charlemagne"), when still part of the Wehrmacht. They are in anti-Partisan operation and wearing Heer uniform with french tricolore armelwappen "FRANCE". They were came from Infanterie-Regiment 638 (Französischer). This regiment was subordinated to the 286. Sicherungs-Division (Security Division) from February 1944

Source:
 "Signal" magazine Nr.3, 1 February 1942 edition

Monday, December 9, 2013

USS Alabama (BB-60) Anchored at Lynn Haven

USS Alabama anchored at Lynn Haven roads on 1 December 1942

Source:
http://www.navsource.org/archives/01/60b.htm

M3 Stuart Light Tank in North Africa

American Late production M3 light tank with a D58101 version welded turret. These late production M3s were called "Stuart Hybrids" by the British. Note that it still has the sponson (side mounted) machine guns and welded hull construction. There is a star atop the turret for aircraft recognition. The sponsons were remotely fired by the driver, but were found to have limited use and were deleted in the M3A1 model

Source:
http://www.worldwar2database.com/gallery3/index.php/wwii0079

A column of German Wehrmacht paraded in Paris

A column of German occupation troops paraded in the streets of Paris after change of the guard ceremony. Please note the German precise in this pic: The front row looks like stair-steps, and when you look at the later rows, it appears that they are organized by size from left to right as well!

Source:
Book "Les Parisiens sous l’Occupation: Photographies en couleurs d’André Zucca" by Jean Baronnet

Wednesday, November 27, 2013

M13/40 Tanks of the VII Battaglione, Ariete Armored Division

Fiat-Ansaldo M13/40 tanks of the VII Battaglione, 32 Reggimento Carri, Ariete Armored Division just before the Axis advance on El-Agheila, 24 March 1941


Source:
http://www.worldwar2database.com/gallery3/index.php/wwii0075

Early Model Jagdpanzer IV at Aberdeen Ordinance Museum

Jagdpanzer (Hunting Tank) IV (Sd.Kfz.162) armed with a 75mm (3 inch) L/48 gun. Also designed as Sturmgeschütz (assault gun) neuer Art (new design) mit (with) 7.5cm PaK L/48 auf Fahrgestell (based on chassis) Panzerkampfwagen IV. This is an early production vehicle because it has four return rollers; later Jagdpanzer IVs only had three. This "short" version of the Jagdpanzer IV is missing its muzzle brake, which dampened recoil and gun rising during discharge. The muzzle brake was found to give away the Jagdpanzer IV's position, and many crews had already removed them in the field. In May 1944, Jagdpanzer IVs were made without a muzzle brake. An updated version of the Jagdpanzer IV mounted heavier armor and a longer L/70 gun. This example was either captured in Italy or Normandy and shipped to the Ordinance Museum for testing. It was scrapped as part of an unfortunate consolidation during the Korean War. Aberdeen has an L/70 version that survived the cutter's torch


Source:
http://www.worldwar2database.com/gallery3/index.php/wwii0070

A Knocked-Out Jagdpanther Being Examined by an American Soldier

A knocked-out Panzerjäger (tank destroyer) V Jagdpanther Sd.Kfz.173 is examined by an American soldier, probably of the 9th Army. While the date and place of this photo is disputed, the red primer on the vehicle, the soldier's uniform, and the absence of leaves on the trees probably indicate that it was taken during the Americans' advance into Germany in March-April 1945. Since civilians and sodliers would strip knocked-out tanks of anything useful, it's likely this photo was taken within a week of the tank being destroyed. It's possible this was a Jagdpanther from Kampfgruppe Paffrath/schwere Panzerjäger-Abteilung 654. The impact of anti-tank rounds can be seen along the road wheels. This vehicle has an early version of the 88mm (3.46 inch) Pak 43/3 L/71 gun that was a single tube; later versions of the Jagdpanther had two joined tubes that comprised the gun barrel. The gun mounting is a later version, indicating the barrel was replaced at some point with an earlier version, or this vehicle was built just as the factory was transitioning to the late model Jagdpanther


Source:
http://www.worldwar2database.com/gallery3/index.php/wwii0068

Tuesday, November 26, 2013

Generalmajor Erhard Raus with his Staff Officers

Generalmajor (last rank Generaloberst) Erhard Raus, former commander of the 6. Schützen-Brigade (Rifle Brigade), commanded 6. Panzer-Division from November 1941 to February 1943. He went on to command 4. Panzerarmee from November 1943 to May 1944. His last rank was Generaloberst


Source:
Book "The 6th Panzer Division: 1937-45" by Oberst a.D. Helmut Ritgen

Major der Reserve Dr. med. dent. Franz Bäke Wearing Black Panzer Uniform

Major der Reserve (last rank Generalmajor) Dr. med. dent. Franz Bäke (28 February 1898 - 12 December 1978), Kommandeur II.Abteilung / Panzer-Regiment 11 / 6.Panzer-Division. This very gallant and distinguished officer, photographed here in 1943, wears the black, pink-piped field uniform of the tank arm; the Knight's Cross with Oakleaves is worn at the throat - he was later awarded the Swords. On the left breast are the Iron Cross 1st Class; the Gold Wound Badge, signifying at least five wounds in action; and the Tank Battle Badge. In his buttonhole ar the Winter 1941-42 Medal ribbon and the ribbon of the 1914-18 Iron Cross 2nd Class bearing the silver eagle 'bar' for a subsequent Second World War award. Most striking of all, on his right sleeve are no less than three awards of the Tank Destruction Badge, for single-handed destruction of enemy AFVs with hand-held weapons at the Battle of Kursk


Source:
Book "The 6th Panzer Division: 1937-45" by Oberst a.D. Helmut Ritgen

Oberst Richard Koll in his Panzerbefehlswagen III 'RO6'

October 1941: Oberst Richard Koll (7 April 1897 - 13 May 1963), commanding officer of Panzer-Regiment 11 / 6.Panzer-Division, and at that period the combined tank strength of both 6. and 7. Panzer-Division, in a confident pose in the cupola of his Panzerbefehlswagen III 'RO6' - note detail of frame aerial. At the right is the CO's signals officer (Nachrichtenoffizier), wearing earphones (kopfhörer). A pole aerial rises behind the Gefreiter standing at the left


Source:
Book "The 6th Panzer Division: 1937-45" by Oberst a.D. Helmut Ritgen

Monday, November 25, 2013

Jagdpanther Tank Destroyer at Aberdeen Ordinance Museum

A Panzerjäger (tank destroyer) V Jagdpanther Sd.Kfz.173 at United States Army Ordinance Museum in Aberdeen, Maryland after World War II. This Jagdpanther, hull number 303018, was a late model manufactured by Maschinenfabrik-Niedersachsen-Hannover (MNH) in late November or early December 1944


Source:
http://www.worldwar2database.com/gallery3/index.php/wwii0067

Hummel at the United States Army Ordnance Museum

Panzerfeldhaubitze (Armored Field Howitzer) 18M auf Geschützwagen (Self-Propelled Artillery) III/IV (Sf) "Hummel" (Bumble Bee) Sd.Kfz.165 at the United States Army Ordnance Museum after World War II. This Hummel was one of 118 sent to France to oppose the Normandy landings. Note the armor plate covering the side exhaust grilles and the added forward armored compartment for the driver and radio operator; this indicates a late model Hummel from late 1944


Source:
http://www.worldwar2database.com/gallery3/index.php/wwii0064

Captured Panzerjäger Ferdinand Elephant at Aberdeen

Captured Panzerjäger (tank destroyer) Tiger (P) - Ferdinand Elephant (SdKfz 184) also known as Tiger-Sturmgeschütz mit 8.8cm PaK 43/2 seen postwar at Aberdeen Proving Grounds in Maryland. Note the open hatch, which let water into the vehicle. 


Source:
http://www.worldwar2database.com/gallery3/index.php/wwii0059

Mustang being Serviced

North American NA-91 Mustang fighters being serviced at North American Aviation at Inglewood, California (USA), in October 1942


Source:
Library of Congress LC-USW361-495

Oberst Alexander von Grundherr

Oberst Dr. Ing. Alexander von Grundherr zu Altenthan und Weyerhaus (1896-1973), Kommandeur Panzer-Artillerie-Regiment 76 / 6.Panzer-Division and recipient of the Deutsches Kreuz in Gold (11 February 1943), photographed in his heavily camouflaged command APC - note large frame aerial!


Source:
"The 6th Panzer Division: 1937-45" by Oberst a.D. Helmut Ritgen

Thursday, November 21, 2013

M3 Medium Tanks at Fort Knox

M3 medium tanks on maneuvers at Fort Knox, Kentucky. It's likely these tanks were part of the 8th Armored Division. From June 1942 to January 1943, the Division conducted training of 10,833 cadre personnel for the 9th to 14th Armored Divisions at Fort Knox

Source:
Library of Congress LC-USW361-188

RAF 15 Squadron Short Stirlings in Flight

Royal Air Force Short Stirlings of 15 Squadron Conversion Flight, 1651 Conversion Unit, in flight. Note the faint squadron code "LS."

Source:
http://www.worldwar2database.com/gallery3/index.php/wwii0044

Tuesday, November 5, 2013

German POWs Captured in Normandy

American troops stand guard behind young German Heer (Army) soldiers captured near the town of Le Gast during the Normandy invasion, June 1944. Although the branch color seems to not match up (happened often), it's a high chance that these guys are from Panzergrenadier-Regiment 156, part of the 116. Panzer Division "Der Windhund"

Source:
 http://life.time.com/history/d-day-rare-color-photos/attachment/1268272/

Monday, November 4, 2013

Wing Commander Guy Gibson With His Dambuster Crew

24 year old Wing Commander Guy Penrose Gibson, Commander of 617 Squadron (Dambuster), with members of his crew. Left to right: Wing Commander Guy Gibson, VC, DSO and Bar, DFC and Bar (award for Dambusters Raid: Victoria Cross); Pilot Officer Frederick Michael Spafford, bomb aimer (award for Dambusters Raid: Distinguished Flying Cross); Flight Lieutenant Robert Edward George Hutchinson, wireless operator (award for Dambusters Raid: bar to Distinguished Flying Cross); Pilot Officer Andrew Deering (award for Dambusters Raid: Distinguished Flying Cross) and Flying Officer Torger Harlo Taerum, gunners (award for Dambusters Raid: Distinguished Flying Cross).  Wing Commander Guy Gibson, who led the Royal Air Force's 617 Squadron, was awarded the Victoria Cross for his bravery during the raids - but was tragically killed when his plane was shot down in September 1944, just months before the war ended

Source:
http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205123900

Generalfeldmarschall Erwin Rommel

Erwin Rommel as Oberbefehlshaber Panzerarmee "Afrika", wearing his tropenuniform (tropical uniform). Behind him standing Afrikakorps officer with the background of palm trees


 Generalfeldmarschall Erwin Rommel (1894-1944) from "Signal" Magazine, No. 17, First Edition of September 1942. He is wearing three medals (!) in his neck: Pour le mérite (received 10 December 1917 as Oberleutnant and Kommandeur of a Kampfgruppe from württembg. Gebirgs-Bataillon), Schwerter zum Ritterkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes mit Eichenlaub #6 (received 20 January 1942 as Generalleutnant and Oberbefehlshaber der Panzergruppe Afrika), and Italian Military Order of Savoy (received 1941)


Sources:
http://www.allposters.com/-sp/Marshal-Erwin-Rommel-1894-1944-from-Signal-Magazine-No-17-First-Edition-of-September-1942-Posters_i1343323_.htm
http://www.warcolorphotos.com/308-feldmarschall-erwin-rommel

Sunday, November 3, 2013

Dr. Theodor Morell, Hitler's Doctor

Dr. Theodor Morell in his Leibarzt uniform. In the ribbon bar, he is wearing three "Flower" medals ribbon (Die Medaille zur Erinnerung an den 13. März 1938, Die Medaille zur Erinnering an den 1 Oktober 1938, and Die Medaille zur Erinnerung an die Heimkerhr des Memellandes 22. März 1939), something unordinary because usually there's only two of this kind allowed in the ribbon bar!


Source:
http://gmic.co.uk/index.php/topic/2551-flower-war-medals/

Saturday, November 2, 2013

German Armored Cars Passing Convoys of Tanks in Yugoslavia

 Unternehmen 25: An armoured column (visible are Sd.Kfz.251 and Panzer II) of the 11. Panzer-Division "Gespenster Division" (Ghost Division) passes the disabled vehicles and burning trucks of the Yugoslav 5th Army in the Serbian town of Niš, near Morava river. Four days later, after initially easy and then also heavy and exhausting battles, the division entered the Yugoslav capital. In the arrogant propaganda report about the advance of this unit, the Yugoslav Army had been referred to with great disrespect – however, in the end, a tribute was paid to the defenders of Belgrade after all: "We have to admit that they exploited the terrain remarkably and defended themselves bravely". The picture was taken in 9 April 1941 by Kriegsberichter Artur Grimm from Propaganda-Kompanie (PK) 691.


Source:
http://bandenkampf.blogspot.co.id/search?updated-min=2015-01-01T00:00:00-08:00&updated-max=2016-01-01T00:00:00-08:00&max-results=50
http://www.flickr.com/photos/16118167@N04/6788758214/in/set-72157629429929865
http://forum.axishistory.com/viewtopic.php?f=56&t=75080&start=420